COVID-19 Vaccine


Approved vaccines are shipping across the U.S. for distribution. Since this is a new vaccine, it’ll take time to build up the supply. Because of this, not everyone will be able to get one right away.
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To make sure people at the highest risk for getting COVID-19 or having severe complications from it get the vaccine first, federal and state governments have agreed to use similar phased approaches designed for the most public health benefit. Our frontline health care workers and first responders get vaccines in Phase 1. Experts predict that, once more supply is ready, it should be available to anyone who wants it in the final phase.

Unfortunately, we won’t know how long that’ll take until we know more about the supply of approved vaccines. But here’s what we do know right now. The graphic below is an example of the proposed vaccine phases, which are changing frequently. Check back for updates. Tennessee residents can use this digital tool to see when you’re eligible for the vaccine. If you live outside of Tennessee, this CDC resource on vaccine distribution can help, or talk with your local or state health department. 

The Four Vaccine Phases Developed by the Federal Government

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PHASE 1

1 A1

  • Inpatient and other high exposure healthcare workers
  • Residents and staff of long-term care facilities
  • First responders
  • Adults who cannot live independently

1 A2

  • Outpatient healthcare workers with direct patient exposure, including mortuary services

1 B

  • K-12 and child care staff
  • Additional first responders

1 C

  • Those who are 16+ with high-risk comorbidities
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PHASE 2

2 A

Critical infrastructure, including:

  • Social services
  • Commercial agriculture
  • Commercial food production
  • Corrections staff
  • Public transit

2 B

Critical infrastructure, including:

  • Transportation
  • Public infrastructure
  • Telecommunications
  • Utilities/energy
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PHASE 3

  • Congregate living facilities
  • Corrections
  • Grocery Workers
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PHASE 4

Phase 4 includes everyone in the U.S.

The Four Vaccine Phases Developed by the Federal Government

Image Image

PHASE 1

1 A1

  • Inpatient and other high- exposure healthcare workers
  • Residents and staff of long-term care facilities
  • First responders
  • Adults who cannot live independently

1 A2

  • Outpatient health care workers with direct patient exposure, including mortuary services

1 B

  • K-12 and child care staff
  • Additional first responders

1 C

  • Those who are 16+ with high-risk comorbidities
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PHASE 2

2A
Critical infrastructure, including:

  • Social services
  • Commercial agriculture
  • Commercial food production
  • Corrections staff
  • Public transit

2B
Critical infrastructure, including:

  • Transportation
  • Public infrastructure
  • Telecommunications
  • Utilities/energy
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PHASE 3

  • Congregate living facilities
  • Corrections
  • Grocery workers
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PHASE 4

Phase 4 includes everyone in the U.S.

 

It’s important to remember this information could change or vary by state or local community.
Since vaccine trials so far haven’t included children or pregnant women, the phases could shift as researchers learn more about the vaccines.

 

It’s important to remember this information could change or vary by state or local community.
Since vaccine trials so far haven’t included children or pregnant women, the phases could shift as researchers learn more about the vaccines.

COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ


Are you a BlueCare Tennessee provider? Click here for information about the COVID-19 vaccine.

All other providers can find more information about the COVID-19 vaccine here.

We’ve compiled answers to your most-asked questions about the COVID-19 vaccine. This is a developing situation, so check back for updated information.

When It’s Time
To Get Your Vaccine


Getting this vaccine might be a little different from getting your annual flu shot. Health care providers had to sign up months ago to be able to give the vaccine, meaning you might not be able to get it from any provider.

Check with your local health department for vaccine locations and hours, or visit VaccineFinder. Be sure to talk with your provider about your health conditions and any questions you have about the vaccine.

Things to know about getting a COVID-19 vaccine:


  • You won’t have any out-of-pocket costs for the vaccine.
  • You won’t get COVID-19 from the vaccine.
  • You may need to get two doses of the vaccine.
  • You should still practice social distancing, mask wearing and frequent handwashing, even after getting the vaccine.
  • You may still need the vaccine if you’ve had COVID-19. Health experts are still learning about immunity to this virus and whether you’ll need the vaccine.
  • You may need to get the shot every year, like a flu vaccine. Researchers will learn more after long-term studies are done.